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Displaying items by tag: scofield reservoir
Thursday, 05 December 2013 03:31

Scofield Ice Fishing Tournament

Scofield State Park provided this information about its annual ice fishing tournament:

Saturday, December 28, 2013 - 6:00am to 2:30pm

Scofield State Park will be hosting the annual ice fishing tournament on December 28th.

Gift cards will be awarded to the Five Largest Rainbow Trout.

The tournament will be stationed out of the Madsen Bay boat parking area.

Registration is limited to 200 participants so register soon.

Sign-up and signing of waiver begins at 6:00 am.  Fishing may then commence starting at 7:00 am and continuing until 2:00 pm.  

Fish check-in will go from 2 pm - 2:30 pm, however fish may be checked anytime during the tournament hours.   

$15.00

242 slots available

Published in News
Wednesday, 20 February 2013 03:44

New Utah Record Tiger Trout Caught At Scofield

I've been hearing reports of a monster tiger trout caught through the ice at Scofield Reservoir. And it now appears the fish is a new Utah record.

Brett Prettyman tracked down details and published them in this blog. Here are a couple quotes:

The monster trout, officially weighed and measured today by a DWR fisheries biologist at the Springville office, shattered the record set last year, tipping the scales at 18 pounds and four ounces. The tiger, a hybrid between a brook and a brown trout, was 32 3/4 inches long and caught by Chris Nilson of Benjamin.

"That's a heck of fish and not that far from the world record," (DWR's Justin) Hart said of the 18-pounder. "I'd be curious to know if that was one of the first fish we stocked in 2005. If it is, imagine what we might see if those fish live a couple more years?"

Read his complete report.

Anglers enjoyed catching fish through the ice at Scofield Saturday, during the first leg of a new Utah State Parks three-reservoir tournament. Brett Prettyman of the Salt Lake Tribune described the fun in this article. Below are excerpts:

Greg Young, of West Valley City, won the 2012 Scofield Ice Fishing tournament with a 16 3/4-inch rainbow. The other fish ranged down to 14 3/8 inches for fifth place. Those numbers are comparable to last year’s results.

 

While this was the seventh year for the Scofield ice fishing tournament, Saturday marked a new event on two other dates at two other state parks. The other two legs of theTrifishalon will be held Jan. 19 at Rockport State Park and Feb. 9 at Starvation State Park.

The winner at Scofield was presented with a $300 gift

Published in Utah Fishing Report
Sunday, 23 December 2012 00:48

Utah Ice Fishing Report

Dec 26, from Utah DWR:

Ice update: There are reports that ice is forming at Pineview, but it is not stable. Use extreme caution.

Ice update: On December 21, Echo Reservoir was completely iced over. Use extreme caution out on the ice.

Dec 23:

Strawberry has ice! There is new ice over the entire visible reservoir. Bays are solid and should support fishing. There may be spots of week ice over the main lake and so use extreme caution as you venture out. Fishing should be very good.

Utah DWR 12-20:

Ice update: The ice at Birch Creek is reported to be 3 to 5 inches thick. Fishing is fair for rainbows during the morning hours.

Ice update: Mantua Reservoir is entirely covered with a thin layer of new ice. Use extreme caution when checking the ice.

Ice update: Cutler Reservoir is entirely covered with a thin layer of new ice. Use extreme caution when checking the ice.

Ice update: Newton Reservoir is entirely covered with a thin layer of new ice. Use extreme caution when checking the ice.

Ice update: Little Creek Reservoir is entirely covered with ice. Use extreme caution when checking the ice.

 

Utah DWR Reports 12-17:

Ice update: Scofield is frozen. Ice thickness in the dam area is 4-8 inches. Anglers report catching a lot of smaller fish.

Ice update: Anglers are fishing through the ice at Huntington (Mammoth) Reservoir. Try using small jigs tipped with mealworms.

Utah State Parks Trifishalon! will be December 29 at Scofield,January 19 at Rockport and February 9 at Starvation. Join the fun and show off your ice fishing skills. Prizes will be awarded. Details.

At last, some of Utah's better ice fishing waters are starting to get a hard deck.

Utah's DWR provided these updates on 12-11-12.

Scofield Reservoir contains soft, unsafe ice with patches of open water. We recommend waiting 1-2 weeks for safer ice.

The north corner of Electric Lake has 1.5-3 inches of snowy ice. The rest is open water. Use caution if fishing.

The majority of Huntington Reservoir is topped with 1-1.5 inches of unstable ice. There are patches of open water.

 

Reports from 12-10-12

Matt Warner had about an inch of ice on Friday. We expect the ice to be fishable soon, maybe by this weekend.

East Park Reservoir is completely covered in an estimated four inches of ice. Good fishing success is likely.

There are reports that the ice is 2-4 inches thick at Hoop Lake. Anglers are catching rainbows in 8-15 feet of water.

Some Uinta lakes have up to six inches of ice. The cold forecast for next week should bring ice to others.

Anglers report 2 inches of ice at Cleveland Reservoir. The catch rate has been about two fat rainbow trout per hour.

The ice is about 9 inches thick at Boulger Reservoir. Fishing is good for 8 to 12-inch rainbow trout.

Published in Utah Fishing Report
Friday, 20 April 2012 17:57

Scofield Reservoir Is Ice Free

(Note: this article was provided by Utah's DWR)

Great shore fishing is underway

Scofield — Scofield Reservoir has lost its ice cap. That occurred this past Wednesday. And that means some fantastic trout fishing is about to begin.

One of Utah's best trout fishing waters, Scofield Reservoir is just north of the town of Scofield in central Utah. The reservoir is only an hour's drive from Provo. From Salt Lake City, you can reach the reservoir in about 90 minutes.

Stand on the shore; catch lots of fish

Fishing at Scofield is usually best just after the ice leaves the reservoir. That's when hungry trout, trapped under an ice sheet all winter long, finally gain access to food that's on or near the water's surface.

Access to food and a surging metabolism create a feeding frenzy of sorts among the fish. Insects aren't active until later in the spring, so it's easier to entice trout using nightcrawlers and commercial baits, such as salmon eggs.

As the ice comes off, trout can be caught using just about any kind of tackle. A "Barbie" rod and reel, with a worm on a hook, is about as sophisticated as you need to get!

From ice off until June, the water temperature near the bank remains cool enough for trout to school close to shore. That makes spring the perfect time to catch trout from the shore at Scofield.

Baits, lures and flies

Three types of trout rainbow, cutthroat and tiger live in Scofield.

If you're after rainbow trout, nightcrawlers, PowerBait on cheese hooks and salmon eggs are great baits to try.
Tiger trout and cutthroat trout are more predatory than rainbows, so they're often looking for something different than cheese bait or worms.
Spinners and lures will often stimulate a tiger or cutthroat trout to strike. Jake's Spin-A-Lures, Kastmasters, Mepps, Roostertails and Panther Martins are among the best spinners to use at Scofield.
A minnow- or trout-imitating Rapala, in sizes 5 or 7, is also a good choice for both cutthroat and tiger trout.
The best artificial fly pattern to use in the spring at Scofield is a brown or green sparkle leech in sizes 6 to 10.
Natural baits

As far as natural baits go, Utah chubs are an excellent bait to use at Scofield in the spring. Chubs are found in abundance in the reservoir.

You can catch chubs in a minnow trap, and then put them on your hook. But before you can place them on your hook, please remember that the chubs must be dead.

You can fish chubs whole, or you can chop them into chunks that will be easier for the trout to bite.

A sac of trout eggs is another bait that will grab the attention of trout in Scofield in the spring. You can harvest eggs from a female trout, and then bundle the eggs together inside a nylon mesh bag that's about the size of a marble. Hide a hook inside the sac, and then cast it out for the trout to bite.

Please remember, however, that if you take eggs from a trout, the trout you took the eggs from must be counted as part of your trout limit. It's illegal to "squeeze" a fish for eggs and then release her. The trout will die if you do.

DWR Sergeant Stacey Jones says more and more cutthroat trout between 15 and 22 inches long, and ripe with eggs, are being seen in Scofield. Please remember that you may not keep these fish. And you may not strip or "squeeze" them for eggs either.

If you catch a cutthroat trout that's between 15 and 22 inches long, you must release it immediately.

"You may not harvest eggs from cutthroats that are between 15 and 22 inches long," Jones says, "and then release the fish. It's illegal to keep these fish or strip them of their eggs."

Best time to fish

As a general rule, you'll find the best success if you fish early in the morning or later in the evening. The trout rest when the sun climbs. Like many wild animals, trout feed most actively at dawn and dusk.

Regulations

The limit at Scofield is four trout. But not more than two of those trout can be cutthroat or tiger trout under 15 inches long. And not more than one of the four trout can be a cutthroat or tiger trout over 22 inches. All cutthroat and tiger trout from 15 to 22 inches must be released immediately.
You may keep rainbow trout of any size.
Trout may not be filleted. And the heads or tails of the fish may not be removed in the field or in transit from the field to other locations.
The tributaries that flow into Scofield Reservoir are closed until the second Saturday in July to protect cutthroat trout while the cutthroats are spawning.
Take your kids fishing

"When was the last time you took your family on a fishing trip?" asks Brent Stettler, regional conservation outreach manager for the DWR.

"For most of us," he says, "it's been too long. A family trip to Scofield Reservoir is a great way to strengthen family ties and ease tension."

Stettler says we live in a hustle-and-bustle society. Sometimes, we get so busy that we put off having fun.

"So many obligations seem to take a higher priority," he says, "but time slips away. Kids grow up and leave home.

"Give your kids some of childhood's sweetest memories," he says. "Take them fishing.

"And remember, Scofield is a great place to fish in the spring."

More information

The latest fishing reports for Scofield are available at wildlife.utah.gov/hotspots.

If you have questions about fishing at Scofield, call the DWR's office in Price at 435-613-3700.

Friday, 20 April 2012 04:03

Fishing Scofield Reservoir At Ice-Off

(Note: This article was provided by Utah's DWR)

Great shore fishing should start soon

Scofield -- Scofield Reservoir is on the verge of losing its ice cap.  And that means some fantastic trout fishing is about to begin.

If the weather stays warm, wildlife officers expect a ring of open water to appear near the shoreline by April 20.

One of Utah’s best trout fishing waters, Scofield Reservoir is just north of the town of Scofield in central Utah.  The reservoir is only an hour’s drive from Provo.  From Salt Lake City, you can reach the reservoir in about 90 minutes.

Stand on the shore; catch lots of fish

Fishing at Scofield is usually best just after the ice leaves the reservoir.  That's when hungry trout, trapped under an ice sheet all winter long, finally gain access to food that’s on or near the water's surface.

Access to food and a surging metabolism create a feeding frenzy of sorts among the fish.  Insects aren't active until later in the spring, so it’s easier to entice trout using nightcrawlers and commercial baits, such as salmon eggs.

As the ice comes off, trout can be caught using just about any kind of tackle.  A "Barbie" rod and reel, with a worm on a hook, is about as sophisticated as you need to get!

From ice off until June, the water temperature near the bank remains cool enough for trout to school close to shore.  That makes spring the perfect time to catch trout from the shore at Scofield.

Baits, lures and flies

Three types of trout—rainbow, cutthroat and tiger—live in Scofield.

If you’re after rainbow trout, nightcrawlers, PowerBait on cheese hooks and salmon eggs are great baits to try.

Tiger trout and cutthroat trout are more predatory than rainbows, so they’re often looking for something different than cheese bait or worms.

Spinners and lures will often stimulate a tiger or cutthroat trout to strike.  Jake's Spin-A-Lures, Kastmasters, Mepps, Roostertails and Panther Martins are among the best spinners to use at Scofield.

A minnow- or trout-imitating Rapala, in sizes 5 or 7, is also a good choice for both cutthroat and tiger trout.

The best artificial fly pattern to use in the spring at Scofield is a brown or green sparkle leech in sizes 6 to 10.

Natural baits

As far as natural baits go, Utah chubs are an excellent bait to use at Scofield in the spring.  Chubs are found in abundance in the reservoir.

You can catch chubs in a minnow trap, and then put them on your hook.  But before you can place them on your hook, please remember that the chubs must be dead.

You can fish chubs whole, or you can chop them into chunks that will be easier for the trout to bite.

A sac of trout eggs is another bait that will grab the attention of trout in Scofield in the spring.   You can harvest eggs from a female trout, and then bundle the eggs together inside a nylon mesh bag that’s about the size of a marble.  Hide a hook inside the sac, and then cast it out for the trout to bite.

Please remember, however, that if you take eggs from a trout, the trout you took the eggs from must be counted as part of your trout limit.  It’s illegal to "squeeze" a fish for eggs and then release her.  The trout will die if you do.

DWR Sergeant Stacey Jones says more and more cutthroat trout between 15 and 22 inches long, and ripe with eggs, are being seen in Scofield.  Please remember that you may not keep these fish.  And you may not strip or “squeeze” them for eggs either.

If you catch a cutthroat trout that’s between 15 and 22 inches long, you must release it immediately.

“You may not harvest eggs from cutthroats that are between 15 and 22 inches long,” Jones says, “and then release the fish.  It’s illegal to keep these fish or strip them of their eggs.”

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